Mainstream media mentions

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Jewels by Alan Anderson Selected for Opening of Kleinfeld at Hudson’s Bay

Dramatic Tiaras a Centrepiece of Anderson’s Bridal Collection

May 15, 2014 – Toronto, ON (Canada) – Canadian jewellery designer Alan Anderson has created a 28-piece Jewels by Alan Anderson collection for Kleinfeld at Hudson’s Bay. Alan’s first full collection dedicated exclusively to brides and the bridal party, made its debut when two legendary brands – Kleinfeld and Hudson’s Bay – opened Canada’s definitive bridal boutique on May 1, 2014 in Toronto.

A focal point of the collection is three, one-of-a-kind tiaras, each inspired by turn-of-the-century European Royalty:

  • peridot and clear crystal based on a kokoshnik (traditional Russian headpiece worn in the Imperial Court of Russia)
  • pink floral based on the Belle Époque period (1871 – 1914)
  • clear crystal laurel leaf design reminiscent of the Golden Age of Edwardian jewellery and recently re-introduced to popular culture by ‘Lady Mary’ in the television drama Downton Abbey.

The laurel leaf design is said to signify triumph in love.

The collection is also comprised of statement collars, sautoirs, earrings and bracelets.  Pieces include a three-dimensional floral collar made up of 1940s crystals in varying shades of purple; a collar of 1950s handmade Czechoslovakian glass opals; a sautoir of 1960s lucite pearls and 1950s Swarovski crystal in 14-karat gold plating; and sets of flawed emerald (1940s), aquamarine (1960s) and vintage Swarovski clear crystals.

“This is a collection for bold brides, who want accessories to add even more drama to their gowns,” said Anderson.  “As for tiaras making a come back, I never thought they went away… they just got rather small and I’m hoping to revive a more prominent headpiece.”

Jewels by Alan Anderson, with prices ranging from CAD$995 to $3,200, will be showcased throughout the 20,000-square-foot boutique.  Brides will have the opportunity to try on pieces with their dresses as they create their ‘dream’ wedding look.

About
Alan Anderson is a Toronto-based jewellery designer who handcrafts each piece, prong-setting vintage crystals and stones to create one-of-a-kind pieces. He does not research trends, instead staying true to his personal style with an ever-changing collection of statement pieces that he hopes women will wear daily “in random acts of glamour.”

Anderson is renowned for his statement pieces which have adorned Hollywood and music-industry royalty.  An amethyst cuff created by Alan and owned by Dame Elizabeth Taylor was part of the Christie’s auction, The Collection of Elizabeth Taylor and more recently, a ruby Anderson collar was worn by Katy Perry in the video for her newest fragrance, Killer Queen.

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[PHOTO] From Pop-Up to Permanent at Henri Bendel NYC

Jewels by Alan Anderson is pleased to announce that there is now a permanent display of Alan’s work at Henri Bendel New York. The recent pop-up shop was a lot of fun but we are truly honoured to now have a permanent home at Bendel’s.

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[PRINT] Alan featured in FASHION 2014 Winter Issue

FOR JEWELLERY DESIGNER ALAN ANDERSON, EVERY PIECE BEGINS W1TH THE THRILL OF THE HUNT. When he isn’t hand-setting stones at his Toronto studio, the 16-year veteran is busy searching for vintage “findings” – jeweller speak for raw materials. His Waterfall Cuff; for example, comprises more than 10 found elements, such as a vintage skip chain, the metal band itself and green tourmaline navettes, often sourced from mothballed warehouses and factories in antique hubs in New York and Europe. “I say the stones were sleeping in a box,’ says Anderson, “waiting to be made into a piece of jewellery” The cuff begins as a metal band, to which Anderson solders a mount for its star stone: a striking rose quartz. With this in place, the rest of the design can be assembled. “Getting it symmetrical takes time and patience,” he says. “You don’t rush it.” The “raw carcass” minus the daz­zling stones (Austrian crystals are his preference) is washed in a tumbler to remove construction residue like glue or clay, before being gold-plated at a six-decade-old Toronto firm. Then the real fun – bauble installation – can begin. “I sit with a stone setter, put everything in and hand-set the prongs,” says Anderson of the more than 200 crystals that brought this piece to its sparkly best. “Just irnagine the conversation it’ll create if you’re at a cocktail party holding a glass,” he says. We’ll toast to that.

– Jacquelyn Francis

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Jewels by Alan Anderson makes an appearance in Katy Perry’s new fragrance video [UPDATE]

A stunning ruby and crystal collar designed by Alan Anderson makes its media debut in the 30-second commercial for Katy Perry’s new fragrance, KillerQueen. Ms. Perry has been photographed wearing Alan’s jewellery before, including an appearance on the cover of Italian Vogue July-August 2012, but this is the first time we see Alan’s work on video.

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Jewelry Designer Alan Anderson featured in Barbara Berger MAD Exhibit Assouline Book Only Canadian in Renowned Collections

Alan Anderson is featured in two definitive new works on costume jewelry.  Anderson is one of the noted designers highlighted in the just-launched exhibit at New York’s Museum of Arts and Design, Fashion Jewelry The Collection of Barbara Berger.  Berger is renowned as one of the world’s foremost collectors of costume jewelry and according to fashion guru Iris Apfel, “The First Lady of costume jewelry.”   The exhibition, which opened June 25, 2013 showcases over 450 pieces of fashion jewelry from her 4,000+ collection.  Two of Anderson’s collars, a multi-layered, pastel floral collar in rose, opaque turquoise and peridot Austrian crystal in rhodium plate, as well as a lacy bib in tanzanite, amethyst and rare, carved opaque yellow stones in gold plate, are on display.

Simultaneously, a new Assouline book to accompany the exhibit, “Fashion Jewelry:  The Collection of Barbara Berger” features the Anderson pastel floral collar.  The book, with a forward by Pamela Golbin, chief curator of Paris’ Musée de la Mode et du Textile; an essay by Iris Apfel and text by jewelry historian Harrice Simons Miller, features the works of costume jewelry legends that include Maison Gripoix, Dior and Miriam Haskell, and contemporary international designers such as Iradj Moini and Robert Sorrell.   With designers listed alphabetically, Anderson is the first feature profile in the stunning tome.

In her own introduction, Berger writes about the selection of pieces for both the exhibition and book, “It was not easy, but I chose pieces that were the crème de la crème of my collection; they are the most diverse and speak to the fascinating history of costume jewelry.”

Anderson is the only Canadian designer featured in both the exhibition and book.  Anderson was on-hand for the exhibition launch which will run at MAD through January 20, 2014.  “It took my breath away to see this exhibition and at the same time realize my work is part of history through Barbara’s profound collection,” said Anderson.  “I’m incredibly humbled.”

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Katy Perry wears Alan Anderson on the cover of Italian Vogue

 

Katy Perry featured on the cover of Italian Vogue July-August 2012, wearing a classic Alan Anderson brooch.

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Coco Rocha Wears Alan Anderson – Flare February 2012

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Alan Anderson ‘Rock And Roll’ Cuff Bracelet Exceeds Book Value At Elizabeth Taylor Auction

December 15, 2011 – Toronto, ON – US$3,500.00 was the final price for an Alan Anderson amethyst cuff once owned by Elizabeth Taylor in the December 15th on-line auction, The Collection of Elizabeth Taylor: Fashion and Accessories.

The ‘rock and roll cuff’ listed on page 232 of the e-catalogue was expected to sell for between US$400 and $600 but far exceeded that when the hammer came down.  The bracelet, made up of 21 vintage amethyst stones set on a two-inch wide, rigid cuff with japanned finish was created by Canadian couture costume jewellery designer Alan Anderson in 2007 for a special ‘glam rock’ event at House of Lavande, Florida.

“Ecstatic,” is the word used by Anderson in describing his reaction to the final sales figure.    “I watched it live on-line and could feel the electricity in the room.”  Anderson is not sure how the cuff came to be owned by Dame Elizabeth but from the auction photo he could see wear which would indicate it was worn often.